AG Daniel Cameron seeks to silence grand jurors

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A previous version of this video misstated the total length of recordings based on initial information provided by Kentucky AG Daniel Cameron.

USA TODAY

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron isn’t taking any chances.

His office Friday filed a motion to stay a potential judge’s order granting an anonymous grand juror’s right to speak out about the proceedings in the Breonna Taylor case.

Cameron’s motion says the failure to delay any order lifting the secrecy of the grand jury would immediately result in irreparable harm to the commonwealth because jurors could talk before Cameron’s office could file an appeal.

The grand juror “asks this court to invalidate centuries of practice, custom and tradition that make grand jury proceedings secret,” according to the motion filed by Assistant Attorney General Heather Becker. “But it’s not just practice, custom and tradition; it’s the law.”

Becker cited a 1924 case in

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Trump rape accuser seeks to bar U.S. government from her defamation lawsuit

By Jonathan Stempel

NEW YORK (Reuters) – The writer who accused Donald Trump of raping her in a Manhattan department store a quarter century ago argued that he cannot hide behind his job as U.S. president to escape as a defendant from her defamation lawsuit.

In a Monday night filing in Manhattan federal court, lawyers for former Elle magazine columnist E. Jean Carroll urged a judge to reject the Department of Justice’s bid to replace Trump’s private legal team and substitute the government as a defendant, with taxpayers footing the bill for costs and any damages.

In June 2019, Trump denied raping Carroll in Bergdorf Goodman in the mid-1990s, or even knowing who she was. Her lawyers said Trump was not acting in his role as president when he said that.

“There is not a single person in the United States–not the President and not anyone else–whose job description includes

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Trump Rape Accuser Seeks to Bar U.S. Government From Her Defamation Lawsuit | Top News

NEW YORK (Reuters) – The writer who accused Donald Trump of raping her in a Manhattan department store a quarter century ago argued that he cannot hide behind his job as U.S. president to escape as a defendant from her defamation lawsuit.

In a Monday night filing in Manhattan federal court, lawyers for former Elle magazine columnist E. Jean Carroll urged a judge to reject the Department of Justice’s bid to replace Trump’s private legal team and substitute the government as a defendant, with taxpayers footing the bill for costs and any damages.

In June 2019, Trump denied raping Carroll in Bergdorf Goodman in the mid-1990s, or even knowing who she was. Her lawyers said Trump was not acting in his role as president when he said that.

“There is not a single person in the United States–not the President and not anyone else–whose job description includes slandering women they

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John McAfee Arrested in Spain, and U.S. Seeks Extradition

John David McAfee, an antivirus software pioneer who fled Belize in 2012 ahead of a murder investigation there, has been arrested in Spain on tax evasion charges, the U.S. Justice Department said on Monday.

Mr. McAfee, 75, is a Silicon Valley legend who earned millions from the computer virus-fighting software company that still bears his surname. In 2012, he disappeared from his home in Belize after the local police sought him for questioning over the death of his neighbor.

He resurfaced in Guatemala City a few weeks later, then largely dropped out of the public eye for years — until 2016, when he attempted to run as a Libertarian candidate for president of the United States.

The Justice Department said on Monday that Mr. McAfee’s extradition from Spain to the United States was “pending.” It did not provide a timeline, and Mr. McAfee could not immediately be reached for comment

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Japan health workers snub COVID-19 database as PM Suga seeks to digitize government

By Rocky Swift

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japanese health workers are snubbing the government’s real-time COVID-19 database introduced in the middle of the pandemic to better deal with outbreaks, pointing to hurdles for the new prime minister’s goal of digitising the government.

Just 40% of medical institutions are using the online database known as HER-SYS that was rolled out in May, a health ministry survey showed this week. Respondents complained that the system is too time consuming to use or duplicated work that they still have to do with paper forms and fax machines.

“There is a big shortage of personnel who can cope with this system,” said Satoru Hashimoto, the director of intensive care at the Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine.

HER-SYS has a “notorious reputation” for requiring more than 120 fields to be filled in, said Fumie Sakamoto, the infection control manager at St. Luke’s International Hospital in Tokyo.

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Nicaragua proposed law seeks to make fake news punishable by prison

Allies of Nicaragua strongman Daniel Ortega have proposed a law making it a crime to spread fake news on social media punishable by up to four years in prison, according to a report.

A bill introduced Monday in the National Assembly would allow sentences of two to four years for “the publication or dissemination of false (or) distorted information, likely to spread anxiety, anguish or fear,” Agence France-Presse reports.

It’s the second controversial bill in a week to be introduced in the National Assembly, which is under the control of President Ortega’s Sandanista supporters.

That bill would require any person who receives funding from abroad to register with the Ministry of the Interior as a “foreign agent” subject to close monitoring and restrictions on their civic and political rights, AFP reported.

Nicaragua's President Daniel Ortega delivers a speech during a ceremony to mark the 199th Independence Day anniversary, in Managua, Nicaragua September 15, 2020. (Nicaragua's Presidency/Cesar Perez/Handout via REUTERS) 

Nicaragua’s President Daniel Ortega delivers a speech during a ceremony to mark the 199th Independence Day anniversary, in Managua,

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Conservative law firm seeks to end Wisconsin mask order

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Arizona AG seeks Open Meetings inquiry into 2 PSPRS board members

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Will Buividas and Mike Scheidt (Photo: Public Safety Personnel Retirement System)

Two Public Safety Personnel Retirement System board members are being investigated for alleged Open Meeting Law violations after they revealed privileged information in legal claims against the state, records obtained by The Arizona Republic show.

Will Buividas, a Phoenix police officer, and Mike Scheidt, a Tempe firefighter, last month filed notices of claim — a precursor to a lawsuit — against PSPRS and its chairman, Scott McCarty.

They allege defamation, emotional distress and interference with business relations arising from an email McCarty sent earlier this year to about 60,000 people. It mentioned ethical questions about real estate deals Buividas and Scheidt entered with PSPRS staff that earned commissions for them. Buividas and Scheidt are seeking a combined $624,999 in damages.

But in their claims they disclosed discussions among PSPRS board members and legal counsel during a PSPRS executive

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