U.S. government signs deal to make more COVID-19 vaccine components

(Reuters) – The U.S. government has entered an agreement with life sciences company Cytiva, a unit of Danaher Corp, to expand the manufacturing of products needed to make COVID-19 vaccines, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) said on Tuesday.



a close up of a bottle: FILE PHOTO: Small bottles labeled with a "Vaccine COVID-19" sticker and a medical syringe are seen in this illustration


© Reuters/Dado Ruvic
FILE PHOTO: Small bottles labeled with a “Vaccine COVID-19” sticker and a medical syringe are seen in this illustration

Under the deal, Cytiva will receive about $31 million to scale up manufacturing of vaccine-related products, including cell cultures and hardware such as bioreactors used for the culturing of cells and antibodies.

The grant will help the company ramp up the manufacturing capabilities of its Massachusetts and Utah facilities.

The U.S. government has till date agreed to pay more than $1.1 billion to purchase needles, syringes, vials and supply kits, as well as expand manufacturing capacity for COVID-19 vaccines and therapeutics in the United States, the

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Lamont Signs Utility Reform Bill Into Law

CONNECTICUT — Gov. Ned Lamont signed Connecticut’s electric utility reform bill into law Wednesday. The law will implement performance-based incentives for electric utilities instead of a flat-rate investment. The bill received near-unanimous support in the state House of Representatives and Senate.

“Utility companies provide a critical service that can quite literally mean life or death in certain situations, and ratepayers deserve a level of respect that puts them above profits,” Lamont said in a statement. “I congratulate Senator Needleman, Representative Arconti, Senator Formica, Representative Ferraro, and subject-matter experts and stakeholders across the state on sending a bill to my desk that sets Connecticut firmly on the path toward tying utility rates to utility companies’ performance.”

The bill was spurred by a few factors. Tropical Storm Isaias knocked out power to hundreds of thousands of electric customers across the state with some people not getting power back for a week or

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Gov. Murphy Signs 8 NJ Bills Into Law, Big COVID-19 Testing Step

NEW JERSEY – Gov. Phil Murphy has signed eight bills into law, creating a big testing expansion for New Jersey now that cases have been on the rise.

Murphy has signed legislation sponsored by Senators Vin Gopal and Linda Greenstein that authorizes pharmacists to order and administer tests for COVID-19 and COVID-19 antibodies.

The law comes as Murphy also announced that New Jersey will double its testing capacity after the Trump administration promised to supply the Garden State with millions of additional coronavirus tests. Read more: Gov. Murphy: NJ Gets 2.6M More Tests That Could Be ‘Game Changer’

The testing expansion recognizes “the vital importance of rapid, accurate and widely available testing to the ongoing battle to limit the spread of the coronavirus,” lawmakers said.

The testing expansion also comes as New Jersey has had its highest daily case numbers in months. Murphy said expanding the state’s testing capacity has

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Trump signs stopgap spending bill to avert government shutdown

Washington — President Trump signed a stopgap government spending bill just after midnight Thursday that funds the government into December, averting a partial government shutdown.

The measure was passed with bipartisan support by the Senate on Wednesday and approved by the House last week. It was sent to the White House on Wednesday evening and signed by Mr. Trump after he returned to Washington, D.C., from a campaign swing through Minnesota, White House spokesman Judd Deere said.

The bill, known as a continuing resolution, keeps the government funded through December 11 and delays further congressional debate on routine government spending until after the presidential election. Negotiations over a new relief bill to address the coronavirus crisis are continuing.

While funding officially lapsed at midnight and Mr. Trump signed the bill after the deadline, federal operations were unaffected.

The spending bill is the result of a bipartisan deal between Treasury Secretary

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Trump signs bill averting government shutdown

President Donald Trump signed Thursday a spending bill that averts a government shutdown and extends funding weeks beyond the November 3 presidential election, after Democrats reached a deal with the White House and Republicans.

The bipartisan text easily cleared the Senate Wednesday by 84 votes to 10 a week after it passed the House of Representatives.

It then went to Trump, who signed the so-called Continuing Resolution in the wee hours of Thursday, White House spokesman Judd Deere said.

Trump needed to sign the stop-gap measure by 11:59 pm Wednesday to avoid a partial government shutdown, as fiscal year 2021 technically begins on October 1.

He signed shortly after midnight, after returning from campaign stops, so technically there was in fact a mini-shutdown.

The short-term legislation keeps government federal agencies operating at current funding levels until December 11, easing pressure on Congress — and presidential candidates Trump and Democrat Joe

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Trump signs stopgap bill to avoid U.S. government shutdown

FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump speaks while hosting an event commemorating the repatriation of Native American remains and artifacts from Finland in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, U.S., September 17, 2020. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

(Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump signed a stopgap funding bill on Thursday that would keep the federal government open through December 11, the White House said in a statement.

Trump signed the measure into law shortly after government funding ran out at midnight.

The law would maintain current funding levels for most programs, avoiding a government shutdown in the middle of a pandemic just weeks ahead of the Nov. 3 presidential election.

It would also give lawmakers more time to work out budget details for the fiscal year that ends on Sept. 30 2021, including for military operations, healthcare, national parks, space programs, and airport and border security.

On Tuesday, the

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Trump signs temporary government funding bill, averting shutdown

President Trump has signed a bill to fund the government through Dec. 11, averting the possibility of a government shutdown when the new fiscal year starts Thursday.

Trump signed the bill, which was approved by sweeping bipartisan agreement Wednesday, into law early Thursday morning shortly after returning from campaigning in Minnesota.

The temporary extension will set the stage for a lame-duck session of Congress later this year, where the agenda will be largely determined by the outcome of the presidential election.

The measure would keep the government running through Dec. 11 and passed by a 84-10 vote. The House passed the bill last week.

The stopgap spending bill is required because the GOP-controlled Senate has not acted on any of the 12 annual spending bills that fund the 30% of the government’s budget that is passed by Congress each year. If Democratic nominee Joe Biden wins the White House in

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Trump Signs Stopgap Spending Bill to Keep Government Funded

WASHINGTON — President Trump signed a stopgap spending bill early Thursday to keep the government funded through early December, after the Senate overwhelmingly agreed to punt a series of thorny debates about federal funding once the general election was over.

The funding was set to lapse at midnight, with the official start of the new fiscal year, and Mr. Trump signed the measure nearly an hour afterward as he returned from a campaign rally in Minnesota, a White House spokesman said. The Senate passed the measure 84 to 10 on Wednesday, but the bill, which the House approved last week, reached his desk after he left Washington.

The delayed signature had little effect on the function of the federal government. The Office of Management and Budget had instructed federal agencies on Wednesday to continue normal operations and “to not engage in orderly shutdown activities,” a senior administration official said,

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Trump signs spending bill to keep government open until December 11

President Donald Trump early Thursday morning signed a spending bill to keep the government open until December 11, according to a tweet from White House spokesman Judd Deere.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: U.S. President Donald Trump pauses while speaking during an event in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Sept. 28, 2020. Trump is set to announce the government will send millions of rapid-result Covid-19 tests to states, and urge that they be used in schools. Photographer: Ken Cedeno/Sipa/Bloomberg via Getty Images


© Ken Cedeno/Sipa/Bloomberg/Getty Images
U.S. President Donald Trump pauses while speaking during an event in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Sept. 28, 2020. Trump is set to announce the government will send millions of rapid-result Covid-19 tests to states, and urge that they be used in schools. Photographer: Ken Cedeno/Sipa/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The President signed the bill upon returning to the White House from campaign stops in Minnesota. Trump did not sign the bill before the midnight deadline to keep the government open, but no federal operations were expected to be affected by the shutdown that lasted less than an hour.

The bill breezed through the Senate on Wednesday after having been approved

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Trump Signs Stopgap Funding Bill to Avert a Government Shutdown

(Bloomberg) — President Donald Trump signed stopgap spending legislation early Thursday to avert a government shutdown weeks before the presidential election, the White House said.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie


© Photographer: Tasos Katopodis/UPI/Bloomberg
Donald Trump

The spending authority of the U.S. had lapsed at midnight. The White House announced that he had signed the bill shortly after he returned from a campaign trip to Minnesota.

The bill will keep the government operating through Dec. 11 at current spending levels. The Senate on Wednesday approved the bill, which easily passed the House last week.

Congressional Democrats and Republicans, along with White House officials, last week removed the final stumbling block, by agreeing to provide aid to farmers and more food assistance for low-income families.

The bill provides as much as $30 billion for the Department of Agriculture’s Commodity Credit Corp., which the administration has used to send virus relief payments to farmers. Democrats got

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