Liverpool City Region to go into lockdown after talks with government

(Reuters) – Liverpool City Region will go into the strictest “third tier” of new anti-coronavirus restrictions to be announced imminently by Britain, its leaders said late on Sunday after talks with the British government.

The government has decided that further measures and closures will apply to Liverpool City Region, its leaders, including Mayor Steve Rotheram, said in a joint statement.

“Pubs and bars; betting shops, casinos and adult gaming centres and gyms will close,” the statement added.

The leaders said the furlough scheme announced recently by Finance Minister Rishi Sunak was inadequate.

“Businesses in the region especially those in the hospitality sector and those serving it will be damaged and many will suffer long term damage or close for good”, they said.

The statement added that the leaders have agreed with the government to remain in dialogue to establish a “mutually agreeable” financial support package to mitigate the impact of

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Liverpool leaders say city to go into lockdown after talks with government

FILE PHOTO: People stand in a queue to get tested for COVID-19 at a walk-through centre amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Liverpool Britain, October 6, 2020. REUTERS/Phil Noble/File Photo

(Reuters) – The city of Liverpool will go into the strictest “third tier” of new anti-coronavirus restrictions to be announced imminently by Britain, its leaders said late on Sunday after talks with the British government.

The government has decided that further measures and closures will apply to Liverpool, the city’s leaders, including Mayor Steve Rotheram, said in a joint statement.

“Pubs and bars; betting shops, casinos and adult gaming centres and gyms will close,” the statement added bit.ly/3iRyMrG.

Liverpool’s leaders said the furlough scheme announced recently by Finance Minister Rishi Sunak was inadequate.

“Businesses in the region especially those in the hospitality sector and those serving it will be damaged and many will suffer long term damage or close

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Sweden’s PM Given Breathing Space to Salvage Labor Law Talks

(Bloomberg) — On Sunday night Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Lofven was granted a last minute reprieve to avoid a political crisis that threatens to engulf him.

Lofven and his government face a vote of no confidence from the Left Party unless controversial changes to the country’s labor laws are scrapped. Opposition parties the Christian Democrats, the Sweden Democrats and the Moderates have also said they would back the vote.

But the Left Party’s Jonas Sjostedt, speaking on a party leaders’ debate on state broadcaster SVT, said that he’s prepared to give the Social Democrat-led government “a little bit more time.”

“It could be worth doing this for a couple of weeks,” Sjostedt said. “I’m prepared to talk, because this can be solved.”

That now gives Lofven some space to rescue last month’s failed set of labor talks. However, the prime minister’s task remains a daunting one with his budget

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Talks to update Pennsylvania’s mail-in voting law show life

MARC LEVY, Associated Press
Published 9:56 a.m. MT Oct. 8, 2020

CLOSE

Many states are planning on drastically different elections this year and mail-in ballots could be a big game changer.

USA TODAY

HARRISBURG — Closed-door talks on updating Pennsylvania’s fledgling mail-in voting law showed signs of life Wednesday amid warnings that doing nothing will risk a dragged-out vote count in the high-stakes presidential election in the battleground state.

House Republicans held an internal conference call to discuss the idea of giving counties four or five days to process mail-in ballots before Election Day and to set down security requirements for the drop boxes that some counties are using to help collect mail-in ballots.

More: Purple haze Pa.: Why the Keystone State is always a presidential battleground

Leaders of the House and Senate Republican majorities declined interviews. Through a spokesperson, House Majority Leader Kerry Benninghoff, R-Centre, said the House Republican

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Pound falls on reports UK could quit Brexit talks next week

Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson as fears grow Brexit talks could collapse. Photo: Justin Tallis/AFP via Getty Images
Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson as fears grow Brexit talks could collapse. Photo: Justin Tallis/AFP via Getty Images

The pound slid on Wednesday, after a report that the UK government could pull out of Brexit talks as soon as next week if not enough progress has been made towards a deal.

Sterling had lost 0.8% against the dollar (GBPUSD=X) by mid-afternoon in the UK, trading just below $1.29. It shed 0.7% against the euro (GBPEUR=X), with the pound selling for $1.09.

The flight from sterling reflects investors fears’ Britain could face severe economic upheaval if no deal is reached. It would likely spark disruption and sudden new barriers to long-standing trade and other ties with most of Europe when the Brexit transition period expires at the end of the year.

Talks between negotiators are ongoing in London this week. The pound’s decline came after a source told Bloomberg the UK

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Swedish government faces battle to stay in power as labour talks fail

STOCKHOLM (Reuters) – Sweden’s minority government faces a potential rebellion by three small parties that keep it in power over plans to ease rules in the country’s rigid labour market.

Talks between trade unions and employer organisations broke down early on Thursday, handing the job of finding a solution to the Social Democrat-Green government. The government needs the backing of the Left Party as well as two small centre-right parties to pass its budgets.

Prime Minister Stefan Lofven had promised the two centre-right parties that if the unions and employers fail to agree new practices, the government would adopt proposals made by a commission to ease first-in-last-out rules, which critics say hamper companies’ ability to adapt to changing conditions.

Left Party leader Jonas Sjostedt said he would try to bring down the coalition if that plan goes ahead.

“Stefan Lofven cannot remain as prime minister if he plans to put

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UK pushes on with EU-reviled law as Brexit talks go to wire

European Union and British negotiators are seeking last-minute compromises on topics from fishing rights to state rules in a belated attempt to broker a rudimentary post-Brexit trade deal

BRUSSELS — European Union and British negotiators hunkered down Tuesday to seek last-minute compromises on everything from fisheries to competition in hopes of creating a post-Brexit trade deal. But the atmosphere was soured by U.K. lawmakers voting to let their government wriggle out of commitments it already made to the bloc.

The EU has threatened legal action if Britain does not drop a bill that breaches the legally binding divorce agreement the two sides reached late last yyear. U.K. lawmakers nonetheless voted 340-256 Tuesday to push the legislation past its last major House of Commons hurdle.

Time is short for the U.K. and the EU

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Nigeria’s main unions suspend planned strike after government talks

By Angela Ukomadu

LAGOS, Sept 28 (Reuters)Nigerian labour unions agreed with the government on Monday to suspend a planned strike over fuel and power price rises hours before businesses were due to grind to a halt, the labour minister and trade unions said.

The Nigerian Labour Congress (NLC), which represents millions of workers across most sectors of Africa’s biggest economy, including parts of the oil industry, last week announced its plans to embark on a general strike.

Nigeria cut costly subsidies in September to allow the petrol price to be determined by the market and increased the power tariff. President Muhammadu Buhari had said Nigeria could no longer afford the subsidies but the unions said a reversal of price hikes was needed to avert the strike.

The strike was due to begin on Monday but Labour and Employment Minister Festus Keyamo said in a statement, posted on

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New threat of government shutdown looms as talks fail to produce deal

With just nine days remaining until current funding runs out, Congress on Monday moved a step closer to triggering another government shutdown after failing to strike a bipartisan deal on a stopgap funding bill to keep the government open.

After lengthy negotiations did not produce a bipartisan agreement with Republicans, House Democrats introduced their own proposal Monday afternoon funding government until Dec. 11, moving “full steam ahead” on a vote Tuesday, according to a senior Democratic aide.

The House will then send the political hot potato to the GOP-controlled Senate, although both chambers must ultimately pass identical legislation, which the president must also sign, in order to avert a government shutdown on Oct. 1.

Recognizing the lack of an agreement, a senior House Democratic aide warned that the bill “may get stuck in the Senate” after House passage, creating an impasse leading up to the deadline at the end of

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