After vandals target Oregon Historical Society, director vows, ‘Our mission will be undeterred’

Amid violent protests Sunday night in downtown Portland, several prominent statues were toppled, windows at Portland State University were smashed and police said gunshots were fired into an empty restaurant.

But the vandalism that seemed to gather the most ire from city and state officials occurred at the Oregon Historical Society, a bastion of diverse artifacts and exhibits on the 1200 block of Southwest Park Avenue.

Nearly a dozen windows in the institution’s pavilion were smashed, said Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk. Flares were tossed into the lobby, and a priceless quilt was taken. Preliminary estimates to repair the damage were about $25,000, Tymchuk told The Oregonian/OregonLive, though costs could end up higher.

The vandalism occurred during a protest organizers billed as an “Indigenous Day of Rage.” The action was eventually declared a riot, and three people were arrested.

Tymchuk was troubled that the society was targeted, especially given the institution’s

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Supreme Court nominee vows to ‘apply law as written’

Amy Coney Barrett
Judge Barrett said policy decisions were for elected politicians, not Supreme Court justices

US President Donald Trump’s pick for a Supreme Court vacancy will tell senators that she will judge legal cases impartially “whatever my own preferences might be”.

Amy Coney Barrett, a conservative jurist, faces a four-day confirmation hearing in the Senate next week.

If approved, Judge Barrett will replace liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died recently at 87.

Judge Barrett’s nomination for the role has proved politically controversial.

It was announced by Mr Trump at the end of September, just weeks before he takes on Democratic rival Joe Biden in November’s presidential election.

Should Judge Barrett’s nomination be confirmed, conservative-leaning justices will hold a 6-3 majority on the Supreme Court, shifting its ideological balance for potentially decades to come.

The court’s nine justices serve lifetime appointments, and their rulings can shape public policy on everything from gun

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Amy Coney Barrett: Supreme Court nominee vows to ‘apply law as written’

Amy Coney BarrettImage copyright
Reuters

Image caption

Judge Barrett said policy decisions were for elected politicians, not Supreme Court justices

US President Donald Trump’s pick for a Supreme Court vacancy will tell senators that she will judge legal cases impartially “whatever my own preferences might be”.

Amy Coney Barrett, a conservative jurist, faces a four-day confirmation hearing in the Senate next week.

If approved, Judge Barrett will replace liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died recently at 87.

Judge Barrett’s nomination for the role has proved politically controversial.

It was announced by Mr Trump at the end of September, just weeks before he takes on Democratic rival Joe Biden in November’s presidential election.

Should Judge Barrett’s nomination be confirmed, conservative-leaning justices will hold a 6-3 majority on the Supreme Court, shifting its ideological balance for potentially decades to come.

  • Trump nominates conservative favourite for Supreme Court
  • The big issues Trump’s Supreme Court
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Merkel Vows Government Support for Germany’s Virus Recovery

(Bloomberg) — Chancellor Angela Merkel said the government will support Germany’s tentative recovery from the fallout of the coronavirus crisis “with all its strength.”



A sign tells customer to put a mask on at a fruit and vegetable stall at Viktualienmarkt in Munich, Germany, on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020. The Bavarian capital city has imposed a five-person limit on gatherings and made mask wearing mandatory in certain public areas in central Munich.


© Bloomberg
A sign tells customer to put a mask on at a fruit and vegetable stall at Viktualienmarkt in Munich, Germany, on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020. The Bavarian capital city has imposed a five-person limit on gatherings and made mask wearing mandatory in certain public areas in central Munich.

Europe’s largest economy is showing signs of improvement, but the scale of the damage justifies Germany’s unprecedented borrowing and spending, Merkel said in a video statement to Germany’s BDI industry lobby in Berlin on Tuesday. But the powerful group slammed the government for not doing enough to bolster competitiveness.

“Indeed, things have been gradually improving since May,” she said. To support this trend, “new debt under extraordinary circumstances is unavoidable — and justifiable in these

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Middlesbrough mayor vows to defy government over new Covid restrictions

Video: Middlesborough Mayor: ‘They are unacceptable’ (Sky News)

Middlesborough Mayor: ‘They are unacceptable’

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UP NEXT

More than 2 million people in Merseyside, Warrington and Teesside will be banned by law from mixing with other households indoors in the latest extension of lockdown restrictions, as Middlesbrough’s mayor took the extraordinary step of saying he was prepared to defy the government.



a group of people playing instruments and performing on a stage: Photograph: Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty



a group of people playing instruments and performing on a stage: Pubs and restaurants in Liverpool account for half the business rates paid in the city.


© Photograph: Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty
Pubs and restaurants in Liverpool account for half the business rates paid in the city.

The measures were announced as coronavirus cases continued to rise sharply in the north-west and north-east of England.

The new rules mean it will be illegal from Saturday for nearly 5 million people in those regions to meet others they do not live with in all indoor settings, including pubs, bars and restaurants. Similar rules came into force elsewhere in the

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