Can I take off time from work to vote? State-by-state guide

  • In 2020, 30 states legally require employers to give employees some time off to vote, either paid or unpaid. 
  • If you’re voting in-person on November 3 or voting early, be sure to both double-check your state’s specific laws and approve your time off with your employer well in advance. 
  • The last day of voting in the 2020 presidential election is coming up on November 3.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The last day of voting in the 2020 presidential election is coming up on November 3, and in 30 states, your employer is legally required to give you some time off to vote, according to analyses from Workplace Fairness and Replicon.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, states are making it easier than ever to vote from home with a mail-in ballot or early in-person prior to November 3. Thousands of employers have transitioned to all-remote work or expanding

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How businesses, government agencies work together to update pollution-spewing older cars

 

Environmental Initiative, along with some partnering organizations, is expanding its work to make Minnesota’s vehicles cleaner, safer and more energy efficient.

This latest work comes 15 years after the same partners retrofitted the first of 4,500 diesel school buses, trucks and off-road equipment as part of what Environmental Initiative called Project Green Fleet.

Environmental Initiative, or EI, is financed by Flint Hills Resources with support from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) and the city of Minneapolis. The group has now launched Project CAR (Clean Air Repairs) with designs on fixing older passenger cars, trucks and vans that cause 90% of vehicle emissions.

Last week, technicians worked on several vehicles of working-poor customers of the Lift Garage on E. Lake Street in Minneapolis that need tires, batteries, fluid changes and the like. The owners were cleared based on financial need to get additional pollution-control work through Project CAR.

“Our customers

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Judge halts work of Trump police commission after NAACP complaint

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While discussing the shooting of Jacob Blake on ‘The Ingraham Angle,’ President Trump said some police officers who shoot unarmed suspects ‘choke.’

USA TODAY

A federal judge Thursday halted the work of a national law enforcement advisory commission authorized by President Donald Trump as part of a legal challenge to the group’s composition and claims that it lacked representation from police reform and civil rights groups.

The order issued by U.S. District Judge John Bates comes weeks before the Presidential Commission on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice was due to deliver to Attorney General William Barr its findings on challenges facing local police.

While the The commission was directed to produce a “fresh evaluation of the salient issues affecting American law enforcement and the communities they protect,” civil rights advocates claimed that it has served to support “unfounded yet repeated public assertions” by the president and the

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Judge rules federal law enforcement commission violates law, orders work stopped as attorney general prepares to issue report

The ruling by Senior U.S. District Judge John D. Bates in Washington came in response to a lawsuit from the NAACP’s Legal Defense and Education Fund, which sought an injunction against the Presidential Commission on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice for violating laws on how federal advisory committees must work. Bates did not issue an injunction, but ordered the commission to change its membership and comply with other aspects of the law.

“Especially in 2020,” Bates wrote, “when racial justice and civil rights issues involving law enforcement have erupted across the nation, one may legitimately question whether it is sound policy to have a group with little diversity of experience examine, behind closed doors, the sensitive issues facing law enforcement and the criminal justice system in America today.”

The 18 member commission was composed entirely of state and federal law enforcement officials, with no one from the civil

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Trump says ‘Proud Boys’ group should let law enforcement do its work

By Jeff Mason

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Donald Trump said on Wednesday the “Proud Boys,” an organization identified as a hate group, should “stand down” and let law enforcement take the lead, following comments he made in the first presidential debate that were viewed as emboldening the group.

“I don’t know who the Proud Boys are,” the Republican president told reporters at the White House before leaving for a campaign event. “They have to stand down. Let law enforcement do their work.”

During his debate with Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden on Tuesday, Trump was asked if he was willing to denounce “white supremacists and militia groups” and tell them to stand down amid violence that has marred anti-racism protests in some U.S. cities.

Trump requested a specific name, and Biden mentioned the Proud Boys, an organization that describes itself as a club of “Western chauvinists” but has been categorized

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Trump says he doesn’t know who Proud Boys are, but tells them to ‘let law enforcement do their work’

President Trump said he is unfamiliar with the far-right Proud Boys, a day after he made headlines for telling them to “stand back and stand by” during Tuesday night’s presidential debate.

“I don’t know who the Proud Boys are, I mean, you’ll have to give me a definition cause I really don’t know who they are. I can only say they have to stand down and let law enforcement do their work,” the president told reporters on the South Lawn Wednesday afternoon. “Law enforcement will do the work more and more as people see how bad this radical liberal Democrat movement is and how weak, the law enforcement is going to come back stronger and stronger. But again, I don’t know who Proud Boys are, but whoever they are, they have to stand down, let law enforcement do their work.”

Trump added: “Just stand by. Look, law enforcement will do

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New California law lets nurses work independently of doctors

Gov. Gavin Newsom paved the way for nurse practitioners in California to practice medicine independent of doctors under a bill he signed Tuesday.

Newsom’s signature represents the culmination of a fight that has spanned several legislative sessions, pitting doctors groups against those that want to expand nurse practitioners’ ability to treat patients.

The measure, Assembly Bill 890, would allow nurse practitioners to practice independently in 2023. Nurse practitioners would have to operate under a doctor’s supervision for a minimum three-year transition period before embarking on their own practices. Current California law requires nurse practitioners, who hold masters or doctorate degrees in nursing and additional certification beyond a regular nursing degree, to always operate under a doctor’s supervision.

When it takes effect in 2021, the new law will direct the Board of Registered Nursing to establish a commission to oversee implementation and requirements. Nurse practitioners must notify patients that they are

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Amnesty International to stop work in India, cites government harassment and threats

Amnesty International announced Tuesday it would close its operations in India after its bank accounts were frozen and its executives were interrogated following the publication of two reports by the group that criticized the government’s human rights record.

The group said it has been a victim of an increasingly aggressive Indian government that has pounced on anyone who speaks negatively about it.

Critics of government policies have faced threats and arrests made by the leaders of the world’s largest democracy.

FILE - In this Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019, file photo, a woman walks past the Amnesty International India headquarters in Bangalore, India. The Human rights watchdog said on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020, that it was halting its operation in India, citing reprisals from the government and the freezing of its bank accounts. Its announcement comes at a time amid growing concerns over the state of free speech in India where critics accuse Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Hindu nationalist government of increasingly brandishing laws to silence human rights activists, intellectuals, filmmakers, students and journalists. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi, File)

FILE – In this Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019, file photo, a woman walks past the Amnesty International India headquarters in Bangalore, India. The Human rights watchdog said on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020, that it was halting its operation in India, citing reprisals from the government and the freezing of its bank accounts. Its announcement comes at a time amid growing concerns over the state of free speech in India where

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China needs a raft of reforms to make new economic strategy work: government advisers

BEIJING (Reuters) – China will need a plethora of reforms if it is to make a new economic strategy that relies mainly on domestic consumption work, advisers to the Chinese cabinet said on Tuesday.

FILE PHOTO: People wearing face masks walk on a street in Shanghai, following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, China July 16, 2020. REUTERS/Aly Song/File Photo

President Xi Jinping has proposed a “dual circulation” strategy for the next phase of economic development in which China will rely predominantly on “domestic circulation”, to be supported by “international circulation”.

“To rely mainly on domestic circulation, we indeed face a very arduous task,” Yao Jingyuan, the former chief economist for the country’s National Bureau of Statistics, told a briefing.

“Fundamentally we must rely on reforms, and we need to deepen reforms.”

Lin Yifu, a second adviser to the cabinet, said China’s new economic strategy was not a short-term measure to

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Amnesty International halts work in India, blaming government ‘witch hunt’

Amnesty International India employees at their headquarters in Bangalore in February 2019. <span class="copyright">(Aijaz Rahi / Associated Press)</span>
Amnesty International India employees at their headquarters in Bangalore in February 2019. (Aijaz Rahi / Associated Press)

Amnesty International has suspended its work in India after Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government froze the group’s bank accounts over alleged fundraising violations, the human rights organization said Tuesday.

The Nobel Peace Prize-winning watchdog said it has been the target of an “incessant witch hunt” by the Indian government for its work, including campaigning for the rights of citizens in the disputed territory of Kashmir and documenting police abuses.

The group has been hounded by Indian investigators for the past two years, is regularly vilified in the government-friendly media and was finally forced to lay off staff members in what it described as a growing climate of repression.

“For a movement that has done nothing but raise its voices against injustice, this latest attack is akin to freezing dissent,” Avinash Kumar, executive director

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