Harry Reid Claims U.S. Government Covered Up UFO Evidence for Years

Former Senate majority leader Harry Reid (D., Nev.) says the U.S. government has worked for years to cover up evidence of possible close encounters with UFOs. 

Reid, who pushed for the creation of a classified, now-defunct U.S. government UFO program, said in The Phenomenon, a new documentary by director James Fox, that “there’s more than one up there.”

Most of the evidence the government has around UFOs “hasn’t seen the light of day,” he said.

“We have it — it’s there,” the 80-year-old said. 

He said the government “did everything they could” to stop the UFO program and “wanted nothing to do with this.”

“Nobody has to agree why it’s there. But shouldn’t we at least be spending some money to study all these phenomenon? Shouldn’t we study this stuff? The answer is yes. That’s all this was about,” he said.

“And why the federal government all these years

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Animal cruelty, abuse reports down for first time in years, humane society says

Reports of animal abuse and cruelty are down across the Island for the first time in years, according to the P.E.I. Humane Society.

The organization says the number of cases has dropped by 44 per cent compared to last year. 

“That’s really significant,” said Jennifer Harkness, the development and communications manager at the P.E.I. Humane Society.

“When we say abuse, cruelty, it means somebody saw somebody … physically abusing an animal or being cruel to an animal. It really can be really horrific.”

Those weren’t the only areas where reports declined.

Other cases show declines

Harkness said temperature-related cases were down 59 per cent, health and wellness reports fell 23 per cent and calls regarding animals lacking food, shelter or water also decreased by six per cent. 

It was a nice surprise, said Harkness, after dealing with twice the workload following the enactment of the Animal Welfare Act in 2017.

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Report card: Jacinda Ardern’s government graded on the past three years | New Zealand election 2020

When Jacinda Ardern took over leadership of New Zealand’s Labour party less than two months before the 2017 election she had the country’s social woes firmly in her sights, blaming nine years of a National party-led government for child poverty rates and housing unaffordability. Ardern promised a government of transformation, pledging to do better on the climate crisis, tackle mental health and suicide rates, and build tens of thousands of new homes.

Her ability to respond in a crisis – such as the Christchurch terrorist attack in March 2019, the deadly volcanic eruption at Whakaari, and Covid-19 – is well-documented and has drawn global praise. But domestically, she has had a political coalition as well as a pandemic to manage: Labour has been in power along with the Greens and New Zealand First.

She promised a strong and empathetic government and a “fairer, better New Zealand”. How has her

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“The Past Few Years Have Been A Slow Decay Of A Free India And Its Body Politic”

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An ambassador and trained facilitator under Eco Femme (a social enterprise working towards menstrual health in south India), Sanjina is also an active member

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After 2 Years of Paralysis, Belgium Forms a (Very Fragile) Government

BRUSSELS — For nearly two years, Belgium has been without a formal government, leaving a country that was already divided by language and politics to endure a pandemic with lame-duck caretakers wielding emergency powers.

A fragile coalition government finally took power on Thursday, ending one of the longest political stalemates in the Western world. Cobbled together from seven political parties, the partnership keeps a growing far-right movement at bay for now and should allow the country to finally pass a budget and consider a Covid-19 recovery package.

But the transition, which is set to be formally adopted by lawmakers this weekend, is not without risk. The governing coalition is now so large that any disagreement has the potential to topple it. And ushering in a new government means forcing out the ministers who have overseen the pandemic response — at a time when infections and hospitalizations are rising.

“The government

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Windsor’s Canadian Cancer Society branch closes after more than 20 years

After being part of the community for two decades, the Canadian Cancer Society’s Windsor branch has permanently closed its doors. 

Donna Gerardi, whose 28-year-old son was recently diagnosed with cancer, says she was disappointed to hear the news. 

“People need to understand that this is a huge loss to Windsor,” said Gerardi, who lives in East Riverside. “They don’t understand what this association does for people in the community until you live it.” 

The society provides support services and information for people and families dealing with a cancer diagnosis including counselling, travel accommodations to appointments and wigs. 

The organization, located in downtown Windsor, has been closed since the start of the pandemic in March and has slowly moved out of the space over the last few months, executive vice president of finance and operations Sara Oates told CBC News Wednesday. 

Executive VP of finance and operations Sara Oates says the
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Trump said in 2011 lower-income Americans should pay taxes to be ‘part of the game,’ though he paid nothing to the federal government for many years



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images


© Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images
President Donald Trump Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

  • Trump said in a 2011 radio interview first reported by CNN that low-income Americans should pay taxes to be a “part of the game” and said half of the US wasn’t paying anything.
  • Trump also claimed he had recently signed “a big fat check” to pay off his taxes.
  • The Times said in a bombshell report Sunday that Trump paid nothing in federal income taxes for 10 of the 15 previous years.
  • Trump paid $750 in income taxes in 2016 and 2017, the first year of his presidency.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Six years before assuming the presidency, Donald Trump said lower-income Americans should pay taxes to be “part of the game,” CNN first reported.

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Trump made the remarks during a radio interview with Sean Hannity, a conservative host.

“The amazing thing is that half

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Fake news punishable by years in prison under proposed Nicaraguan law

Deputies from Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega’s party on Monday proposed a law that would make spreading fake news on social media punishable by up to four years in prison, government sources said.

The draft bill would allow sentences of two to four years for “the publication or dissemination of false (or) distorted information, likely to spread anxiety, anguish or fear,” according to the text published on the National Assembly website.

Under the proposed law, people convicted of fraud or cyber espionage, identity theft or use of the internet to corrupt minors or for child pornography will be punished with two to 10 years in prison.

The law also covers access to personal data and using social networks to threaten or intimidate people because of their ethnic, cultural or religious background.

The bill was presented to the National Assembly, where Ortega’s supporters hold the majority, a week after another controversial law

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How it happened: From law professor to high court in 4 years

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How to Pick This Year’s President

Many folks on social media are inundating me with political propaganda this month; I’ve been guilty of sharing a few tidbits myself and I get it: You want your candidate to win, or you hate both of them and want to revolt.

The problem is that 90% of this stuff is pure garbage (or satire) from both sides.

So who do you support when both options make you want to hold your nose?

Hillary’s integrity issues are completely different, from Mr. Trump’s, but they are on their own merit deeply repugnant to many of us just the same. While Hillary’s skeletons have until recently been under lock and key behind closed doors, Trump has played out each and every one of his personal melodramatic gaffes & predatory business dealings in the gleaming light of the public eye.

This really doesn’t paint the idyllic scene we hoped for, but it is … Read More